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Doctor McCoy Cookie Jar

Posted by T'Bonz - 06/03/13 at 10:03 am


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A new product from Westland Giftware features Doctor McCoy as a cookie jar.

The McCoy cookie jar is the third Star Trek character cookie jar; following a Kirk cookie jar, and a Spock cookie jar which was released in April 2011.

The ceramic bust Doctor McCoy cookie jar will be 10.25 inches tall, and will sell for a suggested retail price of $49.99. The cookie jar can be obtained beginning this month at Hallmark and other online retailers such as Entertainment Earth.

Other Westland Giftware Star Trek products can be seen here.

Source: StarTrek.com

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  • http://twitter.com/bydefault bydefault

    “Dammit, Jim. I’m a doctor, not a cookie jar!”

  • RichFromAccounting

    Damn. I was just about to say that.

  • http://www.facebook.com/Ireland914 Daniel Ireland

    Wow! About time! I’ve been waiting years for exactly this!

  • Guest

    Cookies are disease and danger wrapped in butter and chocolate

  • SJStar

    Its biscuits, not cookies that you add the computers. Get with the programme, Americans. The rest of the world mostly uses the word biscuits!

  • Guest

    You are perhaps overlooking the fact that “biscuit” refers to something distinct and different in the USA.

  • http://www.facebook.com/Ireland914 Daniel Ireland

    Also, this appears to be an American website selling this… so of course they’re going to call them cookies.

  • Mike

    An American website selling a product based on an American actor from an American television series, originally from the American production studio Desilu, then the American film studio, Paramount, now to the American corporation CBS, playing a Doctor born in what was once America.

    Maybe if McCoy himself would’ve called it a biscuit jar, but he wouldn’t have, and it’s an American production mostly for the American audience… So… Sucks to be you, whiners.

    I’ve decided, btw, not to pick an English speaking country per month and bash it… I don’t need to. I’m an American. Our existence is degrading enough to you poor folks, I won’t rub it in…. More…. After all, look how much it bothers you that Americans actually use American terms in American productions… lol… how cute.

  • Mike

    I got all the Star Jars back in the day, those were pretty cool, but these definitely are nice. I just wish this looked just a tad more like DK.

  • T’Bonz

    Look, we still use miles instead of kilometers, so I wouldn’t expect us to use biscuits any time soon! :)

  • SJStar

    Good to see the true narrow-minded bigot in you finally awakening. If you knew anything about Star Trek’s true essence that it is not about America, as Gene Roddenberry’s vision was about an advancement of humankind freed from the shackles of race, nationalism and class. Through his stories he challenges the society limitations of today and harmonises humans where exploration is of space and the human condition. It speaks of a world where all culture, where differences among others is highlighted, celebrated and promoted. My point about biscuits and cookies here is not important, but highlights that others in the world have alternative perspectives. Those without the innate ability to place themselves in the other person’s shoes, are really the poor folks.

    You’d do think, after reading your diatribe here, you are far removed from reality.

    It is funny too, that for sixteen years of my life I worked for a company that actually made biscuits. It was bought out by an American company, who tried to change the process to cookies, but soon quickly rejected the idea because of the negative responses by marketing in that it would actually badly hurt sales. I was actually involved in that process, (One would think that with the American economy is such dire government financial debt, would be trying to improve its balance of trade, and make their products suitable for the export market. But no. It is either America’s way or the highway!)

    As for you persistent “whiners” label, it is wearing a bit thin, being just someone who simply disagrees you. (Someone has to stand up against such bigotry and bias.) Your words here only prove why America has the reputation it has to today with the rest of the world.

    Biscuits or cookies is not the point here. It is understanding that others have a different perspective.

  • SJStar

    There are two kinds of websites; universal or local. Universality would be the go, as more people would read what these pages interesting contain.

    If this is an American website, then it should openly say so. (Then we would have the opportunity to avoid it.)

    I’d too thought that Star Trek was a universal in which there are multiple points of view. The Star Trek you see is the same as the Star Trek I see, and the news crosses all international borders.

    Don’t get me wrong. I do like most Americans, and have several friends who are American. They are open, friendly and generous. I still don’t understand the quite maddening over-the-top patriotism and held insular views, nor why you insist, that foreigners are expected (or even sometimes forced) to stand when the American flag is raised or every time when the American national anthem is played. Yet in other countries, Americans refuse to do so. iMO it is very bizarre, inexplicable behaviour.

    I just wish you guys would greatly just broaden your understanding of others beyond your borders, and comprehend others see things differently.

    Again, if you understood and used both biscuits and cookies in your article, then most would appreciate the thoughtfulness. In the end you might get more people visiting this interesting Star Trek site.

    Again too, I only wish equity and fairness to all.

    Note: Your point-scoring about miles and kilometres is funny too, and every other country throughout the world now speak in metric, except of course America. It is interesting too, that in Star Trek they preferably use kilometres.(As Americans, I note that you can even spell kilometre (it is not kilometer) I.e. In ‘Assignment: Earth’, Scotty triangulated the position of the office for Kirk and Spock in metres. Another is the Galaxy-class Enterprise-D is 642.5 meteers long, 463.73 metres across, 195.26 metres in height and weighs 4.5 million metric tons (tonnes for the enlightened). Roddenberry wanted that the future had used the simpler metric system because it was in units of ten. Although in the TOS sometimes used imperial units in the great majority of episodes, but all the other Star Trek series, especially TNG. DS9 and STV and movies converted mostly into metric units (with an occasional slip up.) As a writer on Star Trek in general, I’d had thought you knew this!

  • SJStar

    There are two kinds of websites; universal or local. Universality would be the go, as more people would read what these pages interesting contain.

    If this is an American website, then it should openly say so. (Then we would have the opportunity to avoid it.)

    I’d too thought that Star Trek was a universal in which there are multiple points of view. The Star Trek you see is the same as the Star Trek I see, and the news crosses all international borders.

    Don’t get me wrong. I do like most Americans, and have several friends who are American. They are open, friendly and generous. I still don’t understand the quite maddening over-the-top patriotism and held insular views, nor why you insist, that foreigners are expected (or even sometimes forced) to stand when the American flag is raised or every time when the American national anthem is played. Yet in other countries, Americans refuse to do so. iMO it is very bizarre, inexplicable behaviour.

    I just wish you guys would greatly just broaden your understanding of others beyond your borders, and comprehend others see things differently.

    Again, if you understood and used both biscuits and cookies in your article, then most would appreciate the thoughtfulness. In the end you might get more people visiting this interesting Star Trek site.

    Again too, I only wish equity and fairness to all.

    Note: Your point-scoring about miles and kilometres is funny too, and every other country throughout the world now speak in metric, except of course America. It is interesting too, that in Star Trek they preferably use kilometres.(As Americans, I note that you can even spell kilometre (it is not kilometer) I.e. In ‘Assignment: Earth’, Scotty triangulated the position of the office for Kirk and Spock in metres. Another is the Galaxy-class Enterprise-D is 642.5 meteers long, 463.73 metres across, 195.26 metres in height and weighs 4.5 million metric tons (tonnes for the enlightened). Roddenberry wanted that the future had used the simpler metric system because it was in units of ten. Although in the TOS sometimes used imperial units in the great majority of episodes, but all the other Star Trek series, especially TNG. DS9 and STV and movies converted mostly into metric units (with an occasional slip up.) As a writer on Star Trek in general, I’d had thought you knew this!

  • SJStar

    Bingo! Got it in one!

  • SJStar

    An American website selling a product based on an American actor from an American television series, originally from the American production studio Desilu, then the American film studio, Paramount, now to the American corporation CBS, playing a Doctor born in what was once America.

    Oh, and all-the-while profiting greatly by exploiting the foreigners. From this, I presume your spittle is also red white and blue too.

    Pathetic.

  • http://twitter.com/bydefault bydefault

    Historical note: By mid-21st century, the dispute in terminology over these delicious confections will result in a global conflict leading to the post-atomic horror period on Earth referenced in Encounter at Farpoint. A lasting peace is to be found only after the intervention of Vulcans as seen in First Contact. :p

  • Mike

    Are you kidding? Gene Roddenberry literally had an alien race adopt the literal Constitution of the United States, complete with our flag, and somehow, you really think his vision was multicultural? Sorry, chum… Gene Roddenberry’s vision was a grand melting pot. Notice, Uhura wasn’t particularly African… Sulu wasn’t particularly Asian… Picard wasn’t particularly French… None of them culturally were anything other than American… which means, what Gene Roddenberry wanted wasn’t everyone to get along as they were… he wanted everyone to conform to the melting pot of American culture.

    And, to be honest, I only read the first 3 lines of that rant, as I really don’t much care what you have to say anymore. I don’t have anything against any other culture or country, but if you want to paint America and Americans all with the same broad brush, I may as well give you something to bitch about.

  • Mike

    Why don’t they just write the articles in French? Or do you hate the French? See the slippery slope, genius?

  • SJStar

    J’aime le français et les français, et ma mère vient de Marseille. Quant à l’inscription en français… puits qui est une grande idée.

    Parlez-vous français, parce que j’aurais pensé que peu ici le comprendraient ? Dites-toi ce qui, tout dorénavant que j’écrirai en français juste pour toi signale.

    En tant qu’I dit, le patriotisme n’égale pas la raison, dans aucune langue à un. Énonciation juste.

  • SJStar

    C’est clairement erroné, ainsi je laisserai d’autres vous déchirer aux morceaux sur ce non-sens fictif pur. Il est clair que vous ferez n’importe quoi et direz n’importe quoi maintenir votre bigoterie. Je suggère que vous pensiez peu davantage dans ce que vous dites avant de creuser un trou encore plus profond. Maintenant vous êtes regarder juste tout à fait idiot !

  • SJStar

    Eh? French? That has nothing to do with what I’ve said. Clearly you really have no point!
    Pourquoi continuez-vous à manquer la cible?

  • Mike

    Ummmmm, except you just proved my point for me. lol, it’s all good. If you have hate in your heart, let it out!

  • http://www.facebook.com/Ireland914 Daniel Ireland

    Wow, took this a little far, eh? It’s a cookie jar because it’s an American product being sold primarily in America.. where they happen to be called cookies. We call them cookies in Canada too by the way.

  • http://www.facebook.com/Ireland914 Daniel Ireland

    Arguing for the sake of arguing lol

  • SJStar

    Again. I hate no one, and has never said that anywhere here, including the French. These are simply your own words and not mine.

    Also, you still haven’t explained that irrelevant “articles in French” comment. If you are referring to the spelling of kilometre, well that just weird. It is clear that the word “kilometre” is plainly the British or common English spelling, and what is strange, that America does not use the metric system, but you still insist on the how it should be spelt? Worse actually, that in French it is actually spelt “kilomètre.”

    Funny too, that I was replying to T’Bonz’s remark. Why are you sticking your beak in here then, eh?

    Below you said; “And, to be honest… I really don’t much care what you have to say anymore.” If that is true, then why don’t you stick to your word then?

  • Mike

    Are you done? Well, then, please, allow me to retort:
    I’ve clearly confused you. The whole “articles in Frech” comment, as you say, was supposed to point out the preposterous request you made that T’Bonz write in such a way that various forms of English speakers would be fully represented by their own terminology. Clearly, since this site is in English, the idea of posting the articles in French would be silly… Just about as silly as having to wrangle a sentence that includes both biscuits and cookies into it just to satisfy your ego… all the while, claiming it’s the ego of Americans at work.

    Follow along.

    I’ll stop there, as you undoubtedly have at least two posts in response to this material.

  • Mike

    It doesn’t matter… He was bitching about Americans releasing an American production into American theatres just last week… Audience context obviously doesn’t matter to him, even when he protests that it does… he clearly has an axe to grind… So much so that your perfectly benign comment got voted down! Why? I guess because you’re not with the burn America coalition or something.

  • SJStar

    Simple BS.

  • Mike

    Not really… Your true colors are readily apparent. You claim all you want is fairness, and yet everything you demand is patently unreasonable.

    When something is being shown in America and not elsewhere, it’s time to bash Americans.

    When something is being sold in America and not elsewhere, it’s time to bash Americans.

    When something is being shown only in America, and reported on a website run by Americans, and obviously about America, the burden should be on the writer of the article, not the common sense of the reader… oh, and it’s time to bash America.

    When something is sold in America and being advertised to Americans, the American terminology should be entirely subverted for non-American terms… and, obviously, it’s time to bash America.

    And when speaking about scientific terms on an American site, Americans aren’t even allowed to spell words the proper American way, but rather, Americans, on an American site, should be forced to use a non-American standard format. So, colour instead of color… oh, and duh, let’s always bash Americans.

    Because you don’t think kilometer is spelled kilometer, that’s your problem. In the United States, that’s how it’s spelled, just like color is color and aluminum has one “i”… It’s not wrong… it’s perfectly right… they’re the American spellings… and that you cannot wrap your head around that, that you think we should subvert ourselves for you, somehow that we don’t do that is our ego… rather than the ego calling for the American site to abandon American English, among other things…. How cute. Would you like the Sudatenland, too?

    You claim there are local sites and international sites… well, genius, I hate to break it to you, but just about every publication, print, web, or otherwise for a hundred years has followed an internal style guide… and if that style guide is to use American spellings and American terminology, well, guess what? Kilometre is wrong. Colo(u)r you stupid.

    So, let’s sum up: You don’t hate Americans, you just hate everything about Americans, down to the way we spell… and we’re so egocentric that we don’t direct everything to your shithole backwater… And even though you suggest the use of both terms, even though it’s not even clear if they’re selling these things outside the US, in the next breath you suggest the American spelling of things just won’t do… so, throw out the American in favor of your Eurotrash variant……. That about cover it?

  • SJStar

    Let’s see. I said “Don’t get me wrong. I do like most Americans, and have several friends who are American. They are open, friendly and generous.”

    What you say here shows you are the ultimate example of the bigoted ugly American. No more needs to be said no matter how much you bait me.

  • Mike

    I know what you said… I also know what you said both before and after that, ad nauseum. Why don’t you just admit that what you want is this site and every other to conform to YOUR preferences?

  • A_James

    Who is this Mike to acting like the biggest Americian a*hole here?

    New Zealander writer SJStar has said nothing wrong here whilst this ignorant American Neanderthal f**king prick thinks it is just perfectly OK to trash the rest of the world and thinks threaten others! He plainly acts like an adolescent child. Yet I’d expect Americans, or any where else for that matter, means you should be expectant to accept contrary views, even if you disagree with them. All I see is this Mike dude is acting like a bully. If an Australian and I find his words personally offensive.

    I only visit this site rather infrequently, but with this kind of childish behaviour I will not be return – unless you.

    Moderator. Please do something about this guy and start moderating these stinking delinquent low-life like this ego driven Mike character.

  • Mike

    lol! Nice… He says he’s done, and miraculously someone takes up the cause! Coincidence? lol, I think not… But, you want to talk about me? Okay, let’s talk about what’s happened here… really… let’s:

    “Its biscuits, not cookies that you add to computers. Get with the programme, Americans. The rest of the world mostly uses the word biscuits!”

    That’s SJStar’s first comment on this article… Notice, he doesn’t say, “I wish you would be more inclusive and use both the American term cookie and the international term biscuit.” No, he said that it was biscuits NOT cookies… Not biscuits AND cookies… But, somehow, that comment wasn’t bashing America or Americans or being an ass about it, right?

    He then goes on to say: “As for you persistent “whiners” label, it is wearing a bit thin, being just someone who simply disagrees you. (Someone has to stand up against such bigotry and bias.) Your words here only prove why America has the reputation it has to today with the rest of the world.”

    So, he was standing up to my bigotry by commenting on the subject with the first included quotation, BEFORE I ENTERED THE ARTICLE? So, what, he’s a time traveler with knowledge of the future now? Curious and fascinating.

  • SJStar

    You sir have a problem.

  • Mike

    lol

  • SJStar

    I should come clean. I said, “Its biscuits, not cookies that you add to computers. Get with the programme, Americans. The rest of the world mostly uses the word biscuits!

    If you read this it should be obvious that, under the definition of irony, that it is an “expression of one’s meaning by using language that normally signifies the opposite, typically for humorous or emphatic effect.” It has been known for ages that Americans generally don’t get irony. I.e. http://www.danjacobwallace.com/american-irony/ [Stephen Fry's quote here sums it up nicely!]

    The first sentence really says; “biscuits are added to computers”, which we all known is opposite to the reality that “cookies are added to computers” in web browsers and software.

    - The “Get with the programme, Americans.” is also ironic, as Americans spell ‘program’ while in British English, it is “programme”. However when referring to software, it is used as the word ‘program’ too! If you got with the program, you would be using cookies!

    - Nad lastly “the rest of the world” doesn’t use the word ‘biscuits’ for computers, it uses the word ‘cookie.” Hence it too is ironic!

    Seemingly only ‘Guest’ cottoned on to the irony here when he said; “Cookies are disease and danger wrapped in butter and chocolate.”, and another ‘Guest’ said; “You are perhaps overlooking the fact that “biscuit” refers to something distinct and different in the USA.”

    Hence my return statement in reply; “Bingo! Got it in one!”

    Yet what is so hysterically funny is that Mike wrote about my first post to this story;

    That’s SJStar’s first comment on this article… Notice, he doesn’t say, “I wish you would be more inclusive and use both the American term cookie and the international term biscuit.” No, he said that it was biscuits NOT cookies… Not biscuits AND cookies… But, somehow, that comment wasn’t bashing America or Americans or being an ass about it, right?

    I clearly wasn’t ‘bashing America” nor being serious about cookies or biscuits at all! It is as I later said; “Biscuits or cookies is not the point here.”

    Could someone tell Mike these were plainly ironic statements? (Clearly he is as smart as a soap dish!)

    Note: My favourite ironic statement here was; “I presume your spittle is also red, white and blue too.

  • Mike

    lol

  • Mike

    Okay, I’ve finished laughing… Now, I can actually respond…

    So, you were being ironic. Nice. Okay… So, you didn’t really want him to put both cookie and biscuit into his article. That clears everything up.

    Oh, wait… no it doesn’t… Nice try, though. If it was all irony, and you didn’t actually want that, care to explain the post that started,

    “There are two kinds of websites; universal or local. Universality would be the go, as more people would read what these pages interesting contain.

    If this is an American website, then it should openly say so. (Then we would have the opportunity to avoid it.)”

    What part of that was a joke or ironic?

    See, irony tends to lose its punch when you actually go about defending the thing you are trying to ironically point out. You can’t have it both ways. Either you were being ironic, or you were trying to make your case for the use of British English… Only after I pointed out what a douche you’re being is that douchery supposedly couched in irony… before I pointed that out, you were defending your point on the merits… So, what was the irony of that post?

    But, honestly, I don’t really need an answer, because the answer is clear. Even in your explanation that you weren’t bashing America or Americans, you bashed them again. But, that was probably ironic, too.

    So, you’re from New Zealand… Good to know you folks have as good a handle on irony as your Canadian brethren in Alanis Morisette… i.e. None at all.

  • The_Comic

    Holy cow this is a weird talk back

  • http://www.facebook.com/Ireland914 Daniel Ireland

    I had a couple cookies with my lunch today from my cookie jar that I keep cookies in. I sure do love me some cookies. Cookies.

  • SJStar

    Cookie! Cookie!” : The Cookie Monster

    (Now being investigated by the FBI for hacking.)