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December IDW Publishing Trek Comics

Posted by T'Bonz - 25/09/12 at 11:09 am


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December will be a busy month for Star Trek comics, with five different issues scheduled to be released.

The IDW Publishing comics for December will include: Star Trek #16, Star Trek 100 Page Winter Spectacular 2012, Star Trek: The Next Generation Omnibus, Star Trek: The Next Generation: Hive #4, and Star Trek: The Next Generation/Doctor Who: Assimilation 2 #8.

The re-imagining of the original series’ Mirror, Mirror episode continues in Star Trek #16. “Don’t miss this radical transformation of Kirk & Co., as events unfold leading up to next summer’s Star Trek sequel!”

Overseen by Roberto Orci, Star Trek #16 was written by Mike Johnson, with art by Stephen Molnar and covers by Tim Bradstreet. The issue is thirty-two pages in length and will sell for $3.99.

Next up is the Star Trek 100 Page Winter Spectacular 2012. In this comic, fans will “explore the amazing worlds of Star Trek through our continuing series of 100-page spectaculars! How do you deal with killing a legend? Find out in the story of Captain Harriman, the notorious commander of the Enterprise when Captain James T. Kirk was lost and presumed dead. Guest starring Dr. McCoy! Discover the devious inner workings of the Romulan military! Re-enter the Mirror Universe as Kirk’s Doppelganger plots to overthrow his superior… Captain Pike — And more!”

One hundred pages in length, Star Trek 100 Page Winter Spectacular 2012 was written by Marc Guggenheim, Scott Tipton and others, with art by David Messina, J.K. Woodward and others, and covers by Joe Corroney. The issue will sell for $7.99

The Star Trek: The Next Generation Omnibus is a collection including four graphic novels in one four hundred page book. Included in this collection are The Space Between, Intelligence Gathering, The Last Generation, and Ghosts.

The stories were written by David Tischman, Scott and David Tipton, and Zander Cannon. Artwork is courtesy of Casey Maloney, David Messina, Gordon Purcell, and Javier Aranda. Covers were created by Joe Corroney.

The fourth IDW Publishing comic for December is Star Trek: The Next Generation: Hive #4. In Star Trek: The Next Generation: Hive #4, “the celebration of the twenty-fifth anniversary of Star Trek: The Next Generation [continues]. Its climactic finale of one of the most talked about Star Trek events of the year as past and future collide! Past and future intersect as Captain Jean-Luc Picard and Locutus meet to decide the fate of the United Federation of planets — and the entire Borg Empire!”

Written by Brannon Braga, Terry Matalas and Travis Fickett, the thirty-two page issue, which sells for $3.99, features art and covers by Joe Corroney.

The last Trek comic for December 2012 will be the Star Trek: The Next Generation/Doctor Who: Assimilation 2 #8 crossover. In Star Trek: The Next Generation/Doctor Who: Assimilation 2 #8, “the epic crossover between the two greatest science-fiction properties of all time ends here! Our heroes launch a desperate mission behind enemy lines in hopes of ending the CyberBorg threat, but there’s a traitor in their midst…”

Star Trek: The Next Generation/Doctor Who: Assimilation 2 #8 was written by Scott and David Tipton, with art by J.K. Woodward and Gordon Purcell and covers by Woodward.

The thirty-two page issue will sell for $3.99.

Source: Comics Continuum

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  • http://www.facebook.com/neidenbach Stephan Neidenbach

    Sure would be nice to have a TNG era
    story not about the borg.

  • http://www.facebook.com/darrinbell Darrin Bell

    Are the 100 page spectaculars just collections of previously published stories? The Harriman story sounds exactly like the one from “Captains: Harriman” (pretty good story, btw).

  • http://www.facebook.com/darrinbell Darrin Bell

    I completely agree. I loved the Borg as much as anyone, but after Voyager devoted half its run to them, I’m tired of them.

  • Polaris 01313-1

    Definitely third that motion. The Borg has certainly outlived its welcome.